Classroom Dice Games

Next weekend, I’m hosting a VIPKid meetup. I’m so excited to meet other teachers in my area, and I want them to walk away with a little bit of inspiration.  So I have tried to put together some fun and creative things in their goodie bags that will help.

One of the things that I’m giving away at the meetup is a laminated packet of dice games that you can play in class, along with a super-cute die that I got at the Dollar Tree. (You guys – these came two in a pack for a dollar!) Here’s a similar, slightly smaller version available through my affiliate link at Amazon.com.

Why play a dice game in class?

First of all, it’s fun! These kids have long, hard days so I want to make their classes with me as fun as possible. Also, games can be an excellent form of extension in class. Here’s a short video I made to show how I would use this tool in action!

VIPKid Dice Games

What types of games do you play?

There is a wide variety of games you can play with a single die in class. I’ve tried to include some of my favorites.

  • Draw with me: Each time the student earns a reward, you (and maybe the student) get to draw a part of a picture. Based on what number you roll on the dice, that will determine how you should *try* to draw it. Note “try” is the key word. I’m not much of an artist, but that makes it even more fun!
  • Conversation starters: These can be great for older students in particular. You roll the dice, and you ask them a question, or they ask you a question!
  • Action games: These are excellent for younger, wigglier students. Each time they roll the dice, it will tell them a specific action to do. These can be customized to a specific lesson (Are they learning about farm animals? Act like a cow, horse, sheep, pig, etc.) Or they can be pure fun (dance party, high five, etc.)

Extension Ideas

I mentioned that these can be excellent forms of extension. At the simplest level, it gives your students experience counting. They can say the numbers or count the dots. If you are drawing, it can be a good opportunity to practice shapes. You can customize the games to be lesson-specific (and if you run out of ideas, there are plenty of others out on the Internet!) My favorite rewards are those that get the kids thinking about the lesson in new and different ways!

Where can I get these?

If you don’t happen to be coming to my meetup, don’t worry! You can download these yourself at https://www.vipkidresources.com/. This is an amazing site by Jennifer Anderson with a variety of props and rewards.

How can I customize this for other uses?

I would have loved to have used this type of game when I was a corporate trainer. I personally would have the game posted or written on the whiteboard at the beginning of class and set goals for the day. Each time we met one of our goals, I would draw part of the picture on an easel, and every student could draw on a large post it. For the dice, I probably would use something like these!

I hope you found this helpful. Have you tried this in your classroom? I’d love to hear how it went in the comments!

If you are new to VIPKid and would like some help getting started, I’d love to be your mentor. Let me know how I can help you through the application process!

Advertisements

ESL Extension

Extension is not just a way to kill time. You want to … expand their vocabulary, grammar, or other English skills.

No one has ever accused me of being short-winded. In writing or speaking, I ALWAYS say too much. As such, it was no surprise that most of my VIPKid classes easily hit the 25 minute mark. In fact, my struggle is usually completing them by about 27 minutes in order to reset my classroom.

Imagine my surprise when one day I met Alina. Her English skills were on par for a level 2 student, but she was so well prepared for the lesson, that she was able to fly through each slide perfectly, with literally NO CORRECTIONS needed! She was not comfortable with free talk, so I had to be very intentional about what I asked her, or she would just freeze.

Thanks to Alina, I had to quickly learn the art of extension, and it has become one of my favorite parts of teaching. I teach Alina every other Friday now, and I always look forward to thinking up new ways to extend her knowledge just a little bit more.

The key to effective extension is your goal. It’s not just a way to kill time. You want to either:

  1. Confirm your student’s understanding of a concept
  2. Ensure your student can apply the new information or
  3. Add new information that relates to the content that expands their vocabulary, grammar, or other English skills.

Below are a few of my favorite extension techniques that you can customize for your classes.  These were written with major courses in levels 2-4 in mind, since most of those follow a similar “flow” in the lessons.

Noun Examples

Most lessons begin with the introduction of 1-3 new vocabulary words. There are always several examples in the lesson and several target sentences to learn. You can introduce new and different types of examples to help expand their understanding of the word, and help them use adjectives to articulate their sentences.

For example, if the target word is bus, you could use the below to extend.

bus

Verb Conjugation

I use this in almost every lesson. I have a few different laminated verb charts that I use, and I almost always go through a cycle of pointing at a pronoun and having the student say the correct word. “I _____. You ______. We _______. They _______. He _______(s). She _______(s). It _______(s.)”

You can then change the sentences slightly. Introduce different toys or characters that “do” the verbs. If Meg is doing it, they must know the right pronoun (she) and the right conjugation. If Mike is doing it, they must say “He” and the right conjugation. If Dino is doing it, they must say “It” and the right conjugation.

Sentence Objects

You can also change the object of the sentence.  If you are trying to teach the verb “point” and the target sentence “He points to a ____.” the possibilities are endless. “Teacher points to a Dino.” “She points to an apple.” “She points to a wardrobe.” (Any prop will likely do!) This can be extension and a review of prior lessons!

Role Reversal

For your more advanced students, you can get them to take on the role of the teacher. Ask them, “What can you point to?” and have them demonstrate, “I can point to a ____.” They also like it if you get answers wrong. If they point to a cat, you can say the sentence, “You point at a dog.” They’ll laugh and say, “No, teacher. I point to a cat.” I would only use this technique if I already had a good relationship with the student and I knew it would not confuse them!

Indefinite Articles

Almost every lesson has the opportunity to extend by teaching and practicing a/an. In all of the examples above, you can demonstrate and explain when to use “a” vs. “an.” Many students pick up on this intuitively but you can always reinforce it or have them explain the rule to you.

High Frequency Words

There are plenty of things you can do with high frequency words, depending on your student’s comfort level.

  • Read them.
  • Read them fast (and time them.)
  • Spell them.
  • Make a sentence with each one.
  • Make a sentence with more than one.
  • Tell a story using the words.

My sweet little Alina is no longer shy. She blew me away last week when I asked her to make up a “telling sentence” and instead she told me a story! You can check it out on You Tube!

Counting, Colors and Size

These are some of the easier ways to extend, and they most likely won’t take up a whole lot of time. But you can always ask some basic questions about the pictures in the lesson.

  • How many elephants do you see?
  • What color is the chair?
  • Which car is the biggest? Which call is the smallest?

I NEVER wait until the end of a lesson to extend. If you remember our objective above, it’s not about filling leftover time, it’s about truly expanding on what your student is learning. Throughout the lesson, I look for opportunities that lend themselves to the examples above. I try to set my pace to approximately one slide per minute. If I check, and we have time, then I will introduce one of these methods into the lesson at the appropriate time. If not, I keep moving.

I hope you found this helpful. If you have ideas of your own, I’d love to hear them in the comments!

If you are new to VIPKid and are looking for a mentor to help you with these (and other) ESL teaching techniques, I’d love to help you!

Happy teaching!